Saving Throws for Items

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When a character's body is thrown, broken or subjected to a wide range of natural and magical attacks, the character's body is not the only thing that is affected. Equipment can be wrecked or incinerated, clothes can be made unwearable, substances can be rendered inert or useless and even armour can be destroyed. Therefore, when a character is subjected to any of the attacks listed below, the objects worn and carried by the character must also make a saving throw or else be ruined.

Item
material
Acid Crushing
blow
Disin-
tegrate
Electricity Fall Fireball Fire
(magical)
Fire
(normal)
Frost Lightning Normal
blow
bone or
ivory
11 16 10 20 6 12 4 3 2 8 1
book or
leather
10 4 2 20 1 8 5 4 3 13 1
ceramic or
pottery
4 18 12 19 11 5 3 2 4 2 1
cloth
(food)
12 6 3 20 2 15 14 13 1 18 1
crystal
or vial
6 19 14 20 13 5 4 3 7 15 5
gem or
pebble
3 17 7 18 4 5 3 2 1 14 2
glass 5 20 15 20 14 6 5 4 6 17 1
liquid 15 1 1 20 1 15 14 13 12 18 15
metal
(hard)
7 6 2 17 2 6 2 1 1 11 1
metal
(soft)
13 14 9 19 4 13 6 5 1 16 1
mirror 12 20 15 20 13 9 6 5 6 18 1
paper or
parchment
16 11 6 20 1 8 18 17 2 20 1
wood or
rope (thin)
9 13 6 20 2 12 10 9 1 10 1
wood or
rope (thick)
8 10 3 19 1 8 6 5 1 12 1

Adjustments

Magical items receive a minimum +1 save against these attacks, with a better bonus if the item is an armour or weapon whose modifier is higher. This also applies to items like bracers, a cloak or a ring of protection. Both a cloak or a ring of protection will grant a +1 modifier to all other objects carried by the person as well. If the magical item is specifically designed to resist the attack form (such as a ring of fire resistance vs. fire of any kind), then the save bonus is +5.

Items that are protected by some outer covering or container need not make save if the covering or container survives. For example, a scroll in a scrollcase, or a spellbook inside a box, are safe from save if the scrollcase or the box succeed in their rolls. A character's doublet need not save if a layer or outer armour or the covering hauberk survive.

Notes on Attack Forms

  • Crushing blow: describes any great or fierce physical blow that causes 33 damage or more. Roll a 50/50 chance to see if the character's weapon or shield must save first; if there is no shield, then it must be either the character's armour or weapon. If the weapon or shield fails, the armour must save afterwards. If the armour fails (or there was no armour), then everything on the character's upper body, both back and front, must make save (following the armour's fail, it is assumed the force has knocked the character down).
  • Disintegrate: describes effects similar to the spell of the same name. Everything within a 10 ft. diameter cube must make save regardless of outer covering or protection.
  • Electricity: includes all natural electrical discharges other than lightning. Examples include the electric eel's attack and the electrical glyph of warding. Shocking grasp is not included. A saving throw for items is not necessary if the target is not grounded.
  • Fall: describes falls where a minimum of 22 hit points of damage occurs. Unless the landing surface is 20° or more, roll 50/50 for the character's back or front to determine which carried objects are affected by the fall.
  • [[Fireball (spell)|Fireball: describes the effects of the spell, which lasts for a split-second. A failed save will scorch or discolour materials but will not render them useless, except in the case of delicate magical formulas such as potions, oils, ointments and healing salves. Magical scrolls that fail save have a 20% chance of being made unreadable; likewise, if a spellbook fails save, each individual spell in the book has a 20% chance of being made unreadable, so that it must be replaced.
  • Fire (magical): describes one combat round's sustained exposure to fire produced by magical spells, such as burning hands, wall of fire and flame strike. Flammable objects failing their save will be set alight with normal fire. Other objects are considered scorched, smoked or singed, so that they are reduced in value by 20%. A saving throw must be made for each round that an object is exposed to magical fire.
  • Fire (normal): describes one combat round's sustained exposure to naturally occurring fire, including burning oil, exposure to a firepit or a burning environment such as a house or forest fire. Flammable objects failing their save will be set alight. Other objects are considered scorched, smoked or singed, so that they are reduced in value by 10%. A saving throw must be made for each round that an object is exposed to normal fire.
  • Frost: describes one hour's sustained exposure to ice crystals that infuse the object, coating it with rime or frost and causing its temperature to fall well below freezing. Objects that contain water will be split open by expanding ice. Paper, once it has thawed, will become wet and useless. Mirrors, glass and vials will crack. Hard metal or stone will, if subjected to a normal blow, will break without gaining a saving throw.
  • Lightning: describes both magical and natural bolts of lightning passing through creatures and objects. Unlike natural lightning, magical lightning does not require the target to be grounded. As lightning passes through every part of its target, all objects must make save regardless of protection or location on the body.
  • Normal blow: describes any strong physical blow that causes 22-32 damage (for greater blows, see crushing blow, above. Roll a 50/50 chance to see if the character's weapon or shield must save first; if there is no shield, then it must be either the character's armour or weapon. If the weapon or shield fails, the armour must save afterwards. If the armour fails (or there was no armour), then everything on the character's upper body, both back and front, must make save (following the armour's fail, it is assumed the force has knocked the character down).

Notes on Materials

  • Bone or ivory: includes carved or otherwise fragile examples; unworked bones or tusks should be treated at thin or thick wood.
  • Book or leather: includes armour made of leather or studded leather, tack, harnesses, straps, belts and most similar goods. The paper inside leather bound books need save only if the leather fails; books without leather binding should be treated as paper.
  • Ceramic or pottery: describes clay material goods of all sorts, with the exception of faience or majolica, which should be treated as crystal. When thrown as grenade missiles, ceramic flasks must break before the contents will have the desired effects. See liquids.
  • Cloth (food): describes all natural fibres. Types of food that are sensitive to the attack form being saved against should save as cloth.
  • Crystal or vial: describes glass that is made with lead; includes crystal balls, vials, lenses, figurines and ornaments.
  • Gem or pebble: describes any mineral stone smaller than a plum in size. Larger stones are virtually immune to destruction, even disintegration. For organic gems such as amber, mother-of-pearl and pearls, see metal (soft).
  • Glass: includes glazed windows, lantern glass, bottles and other like objects made of ordinary glass. See crystal.
  • Liquid: includes magical potions, oils, salves and pastes; vitriol, aqua fortis and regia, distilled and fermented beverages, wine and vinegar, whale and lamp oil, perfume and poison. These must make saving throw regardless of the container's successful save, as a failure will indicate that the magic has been disrupted or that the liquid has gone rancid or become distasteful. Oils will not explode from magical or normal fire, or lightning, as long as they are still contained.
  • Metal (hard): describes smithed and wrought metals used to make weapons, armour, tools, nails or other construction materials. The thickness of the metal is immaterial, only the manner in which the weapon was forged.
  • Metal (soft): describes shaped or cold-hammered metal, including jewelry that has not been hard-forged into shapes and angles before manufacture. Organic minerals, such as amber, mother of pearl or pearls, save as soft metal.
  • Mirror: describes silvered glass. Steel mirrors that do not include glass should be treated as metal (hard). Silver mirrors without glass should save as metal (soft).
  • Paper or parchment: describes unprotected sheets of paper or thin, unbound pamphlets; includes magical scrolls, dried leaves, field stubble or dry crops and grass. Failure to save vs. fire or lightning will cause paper and the outer pages of unbound books to burst into flame.
  • Wood or rope (thin): describes examples in which the principle diameter of the object is less than ¾ths of an inch, including arrows, ordinary rope, bows, wooden weapons and handles, tools and so on.
  • Wood or rope (thick): describes wood that cannot be considered thin, including that used for construction and living purposes, doors, floor planks, furniture, wagons, carts, heavy cable ropes and wooden armour.


See Also,
Combat
Injuries
Saving Throws